At the Mountains of Madness: A Cozy Bedtime Story

H.P. Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness

Tekeli-li! Tekeli-li! What a cozy bedtime story!

At The Mountains of Madness Radio Drama

  • Series Title: Dark Adventure Radio Theater
  • Publisher: H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society
  • Media: MP3, Audio CD
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Length: 77 minutes
  • Amazon | H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society

I’ve never been fond of old 1930s radio shows nor bothered to go out of my way to listen to one. I have not even listed to the famed Mercury Theater’s The War of the Worlds 1938 radio drama. But after listening to H.P. Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness, I think I’ve changed my mind about radio dramas.

Dark Adventure Radio Theater is a series of modern-day radio dramas produced in the style of the 1930s. This is a lovingly and professionally crafted series, done by the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society; complete with sound effects and superb voice acting.

I wasn’t intending to listen to this series when I first did my search for At the Mountains of Madness. My initial goal was to do research for my character in my group’s Call of Cthulhu game. But in doing so, I selected H.P. Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness as my first radio drama and I was not disappointed.

The radio starts out as an interview with Dyer and the host of Dark Adventure Radio Theater, Chester Langfield. And later many of Dyer’s explanations of the previous expedition found in the book were replaced with ‘news reports’ by Nathan Reed of Worldwide Wireless News. At first I was kind of put off by this form of storytelling, rather than the normal narration that I expected. As the story continued to Dyer’s own experience in the Antarctic, I found the highly entertaining voice acting of Dryer and Danforth kept me going, and through the end. Much of the lengthy detail found in the book was cut down, but the basic plot remains.

The opening of the radio show itself and fake cigarette commercial was cute, but unnecessary. I also felt that the radio news reports in the beginning should have been shorter. I will admit that these things did add to the atmosphere of the story, but I’m unsure that they would have made any difference if I didn’t hear them at all. The “news” portion did add a historic feel to the story; it felt as if the events of the expedition really did take place sometime in the late 1930s or early 1940s.

My favorite portion of the show is when Dyer and Danforth explore the city of the Elder Things on foot. The musical score accompanied by the exciting sound effects also aided in the entertainingly unveiling horror of the story.

Overall, I would recommend this adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness. Great for listing on your commute or cuddled up on the couch in a dim lit room. Though if you’re like me, and dare to listen to this radio show before going to bed, you’ll surely dream about Elder Things! That night, I dreamed of leafing through an elephant folio of “Audubon’s Horrid Creatures of the Mythos” in a quaint drawing room while having black ichor Shoggoth tea. Oh Tekeli-li!

I should say that since I bought the downloadable MP3, I didn’t get the props included with the Audio CD version which is an added bonus if you’re a Lovecraft fan. The props include: a page ripped from Danforth’s sketchbook, a page from the Arkham Advertiser detailing the progress of Miskatonik’s Antartic expedition, and two photographs of Dyer and Danforth among the ruins of the Elder Things’ city.  They also offer a free downloadable PDF of the script.

Sucker Punch: Makes Love to Your Eyes While it Shits in Your Brain

Sucker Punch is beautiful to watch. The dream-dance sequences are visually stunning and the fight choreography quite excellent. Much of it reminded me of some of my favorite anime.  Really, if I were to compare it to something more similar, it would be a really well done anime music video. I adore the costumes in this movie. Both from the night club sequences and the fight scenes. I can really see these as the next cosplay hit at some comicon or sci-fi con. Oh, I also have to point out that this is the only movie that I’ve watched that had the worlds “clockworks” and “steam” mentioned in the same line with “undead” and “Nazis”  — the few keywords to give me a geeky woody.

As a geeky teen age girl, I loved guns, mecha, swords, airships, and kick-ass kung-fu moves. I really didn’t connect with the standard girl movies – well, because … they didn’t have enough dragons, nor any mechas with pink skull bunnies painted on them!  If I was 14 years old, I would have absolutely loved this movie for its strong untraditional delivery of girl-power messages. The plot is on a child-like level, almost allegorical or mythical at times.  With simple messages such as “fight for your freedom,” “sacrifice for love” and “friends stick together.”  As an adult these simple ideas are cute, but not at all interesting or thought provoking. These basic concepts lead to really basic acting, with extremely mind-numbing execution. You could really watch Sucker Punch without these absurd “in-between” scenes and still get the summary of the plot. I admit that all of movie seems hazy and dream like, like one big metaphor with nested metaphors. Did they really need 2 hours to explain this? No not really, a half an hour would have been fine, but someone had enough money and some spanking cover songs.

All the characters are of singular dimension, kind of like comic book characters or children’s picture book characters. Adults are foolish and evil. The girls are oppressed, but learn to fight together. The protagonist is the catalyst with her raw tenacity.  There’s even an old man with words of wisdom such as, “Don’t write a check with your mouth if you can’t cover it with your ass.” Trivial characters typical translate into really horrible acting. Their shallow personalities have most likely made me care less about what happened to them.

I do have to ask, was it intentional that they left the real events vague and the real people involved so undefined? Perhaps; it was a dreamy metaphor of a young girl’s perspective after all.

I would say watch this movie if you want to have a good time with friends, maybe have a few beers before seeing it.  Or rent the DVD at home – I have a feeling that the DVD will have more eye-loving content.  Oh and try not to expect much in terms of story or plot, you’ll just end up disappointed.

And oh yes, enjoy the love making to your eyes, close off your brain so the shit can’t get in.

 

Basics of Alignment Weapon Enhancements

Opposing Alignment Weapon Enhancments (Prefix)

Weapons enchanted with alighnment damage can penetrate the damage reduction of powerful creatures and do extra damage on normal monsters with opposing alignment. Those of opposite alignment who weild these kinds of weapons will be affected with one temporary negative level. Those of True Neutral alignment are opposite of nothing, so these characters are not effected by opposite alignment weapons.

All opposite alignment enchantments is equivalent to a +2 enhancement in terms of Total Modifier Value.

True Chaos Weapon

Opposing Alignment
Prefix Name
Weapon Modifier Value Description Monster Notes
Holy

(good)

+2 A holy weapon is imbued with holy powers. This power makes the weapon good-aligned. Evil characters wielding this weapon suffers a negative level. The weapon deals an extra 2d6 against all targets of evil alignment. By-passes the DR of Abishai, Bezekira, Bearded Devils, Dream Scourge, Dream Stealer, Ghostly Skeletons, Orthons, Succubus

Piercing + Good will by-pass the DR of Rakshasa

Crystal + Good by-passes the DR of the Dream Devourer

Cold Iron + Good by-passes the DR of Flesh Renders, Ice Flensers, Fire Reavers, Maraliths

Axiomatic

(lawful)

+2 An axiomatic weapon is lawfully aligned and infused with the power of law. It makes the weapon law-aligned and thus bypass the corresponding damage reduction. The weapon deals an extra 2d6 against all targets of chaotic alignment. By-passes the DR Thaarak Hound
Anarchic

(chaotic)

+2 An anarchic weapon is chaotically aligned and infused with the power of chaos. It makes the weapon chaos-aligned and thus bypass the corresponding damage reduction. The weapon deals an extra 2d6 against all targets of lawful alignment. By-passes the DR of Maruts

True or Pure Alignment Weapon Enhancements (Prefix / Suffix)

A True Aligned weapon is infused with the power of an alignment and effect more targets than normal “Alignment” prefix weapons, but do less bonus damage. It does an additional 1d6 damage to targets of other alignments and can only be wielded by characters of the matching alignment. This requirement can be bypassed with a Use Magic Device skill of 20 or higher. Note that you only need to hit UMD 20 to equip the item; once equipped, it will stay equipped until you log out or switch weapons.

Pure good is an anomaly in that it is a Suffix and not a Prefix weapon enhancement.

True Alignment Name Weapon Modifier Value Description
True Law

(prefix)

+1 This weapon is infused with the power of True Law. It does an additional 1d6 damage to non-lawful targets and can only be wielded by Lawful aligned characters.
True Chaos

(prefix)

+1 This weapon is infused with the power of True Chaos. It does an additional 1d6 damage to non-chaotic targets and can only be wielded by Chaotic aligned characters.
Pure Good

(suffix)

+1 This weapon is infused with the power of Pure Good. It does an additional 1d6 damage to non-good targets and can only be wielded by Good aligned characters.

Tomorrow, I’ll go over the Basics of Bane Weapon Enhancements.


Phat Loots! is a semi-random column at Anne’s My.DDO.com blog discussing various topics on DDO items, their mechanics, and crafting systems. Sometimes pictures of particularly tasty gear is posted. At any rate, its all about loot and how much I like them.

Basics of Elemental Weapon Enhancements

Elemental Weapon Enhancements (Prefix)

An elemental weapon has been sheathed in an element and deals an additional 1d6 elemental damage per hit.  Some will take additional or double damage from a particular element, while others will be immune or even heal based on the elemental damage done. Elemental damage is equivalent to a +1 enhancement in terms of item value.

Icy Burst Weapon

Regular Elemental
Damage Prefix Name
Weapon Modifier Value Description Monster Notes
Flaming +1 This weapon is sheathed in fire. A flaming weapon deals an extra 1d6 of fire damage on a successful hit. Good against Ice Flenser, Mummy, Ice Memphets, Trolls

Monsters immune to fire are Bearded Devils, Fire Reaver, Fire Elemental, Hellhound, Horned Devil, Orthon, Pit Fiend, Sulatar Humanoid

Iron Golems are healed by fire damage

Frost +1 This weapon is sheathed in icy cold. A frost weapon deals an extra 1d6 of cold damage on a successful hit. Good against Fire Reaver, Fire Elementals. Hellhound

Monsters immune to cold damage Ice Flenser and Ice Memphets.

Rakshasas, Devils and Orthons are resistant to cold damage

Shock +1 This weapon is sheathed in crackling electricity. A shocking weapon deals an extra 1d6 of electricity damage on a successful hit. Drowned zombies vulnerable to electricity.

Mariliths and Jariliths are immune to electricity damage.

Flesh Golems are hasted by electricity damage

Acid +1 This weapon is sheathed in corrosive acid. An acid weapon deals an extra 1d6 of acid damage on a successful hit. Rakshasas are resistant to acid damage

Clay Golems are healed by acid damage

Elemental Burst Weapon Enhancement (Prefix)

Elemental weapons do typically does an additional xd10 damage, x being the number of dice based on the critical range of the weapon.  Elemental burst damage is equivalent to a +1 enhancement in terms of item value.

Burst Elemental
Damage Prefix Name
Weapon Modifier Value Description
Flaming Burst +1 This weapon is sheathed in fire. A flaming weapon deals an extra 1d6 of fire damage on a successful hit. In addition, critical hits deal an additional 1d10 fire damage for a weapon with a x2 critical multiplier, 2d10 for a x3 critical multiplier and 3d10 for a x4 critical multiplier.
Icy Burst +1 This weapon is sheathed in icy cold. A frost weapon deals an extra 1d6 of cold damage on a successful hit. In addition, critical hits deal an additional 1d10 cold damage for a weapon with a x2 critical multiplier, 2d10 for a x3 critical multiplier and 3d10 for a x4 critical multiplier.
Shocking Burst +1 This weapon is sheathed in crackling eletricity. A shocking weapon deals an extra 1d6 of eletricity damage on a successful hit. In addition, critical hits deal an additional 1d10 electric damage for a weapon with a x2 critical multiplier, 2d10 for a x3 critical multiplier and 3d10 for a x4 critical multiplier.
Acid Burst +1 This weapon is sheathed in corrosive acid. An acid weapon deals an extra 1d6 of acid damage on a successful hit. In addition, critical hits deal an additional 1d10 acid damage for a weapon with a x2 critical multiplier, 2d10 for a x3 critical multiplier and 3d10 for a x4 critical multiplier.

NOTE: Acid Burst can only be gotten on unique weapons and not on randomly-generated loot.

Thundering +1 A thundering weapon creates a cacophonous roar when striking a successful critical hit. A thundering weapon deals an extra 1d8 points of sonic damage upon a successful critical hit with a weapon that has a x2 critical multiplier, an extra 2d8 for a x3 multiplier, and an extra 3d8 for x4 multiplier

A few words about Total Modifier Value

The Total Modifier Value (sometimes called Total Enchantent Bonus Value or Base Price Modifier) of an item is determined by its enhancement level. A +4 breast plate, a +4 longsword and a +4 dagger each has a Total Modifier Value of 4. Every special prefix and sufix enhancement adds to the value of the item. The Total Modifier Value of an item affects two things: 1) an item’s base value and 2) Its minimum level requirement

The current maximum for Total Modifier Value in the game for any randomly generated item is 11. Any higher than that would mean that that the minimum level to equip the item is above 20. A race restricted item has a minimum level restriction of two lower than non-restricted version of the same item. To calculate the minimum leave of an weapon, the formula is (Total Modifier Value * 2) - 2 or (Total Modifier Value * 2) - 4 for items with race restrictions.

Tomorrow, I’ll go over the Basics of Alignment Weapon Enhancements.


Phat Loots! is a semi-random column at Anne’s My.DDO.com blog discussing various topics on DDO items, their mechanics, and crafting systems. Sometimes pictures of particularly tasty gear is posted. At any rate, its all about loot and how much I like them.

Basics of Weapon Materials

epicrobeofshadow.jpgMaterials are what the weapon is made out of. They have no effect on the minimum level to wield the weapon. Each of the materials described below has a definite game effect. Some creatures have damage reduction based on their creature type or core concept. Some are resistant to all but a special type of damage, such as that dealt by evil-aligned weapons or bludgeoning weapons. Others are vulnerable to weapons of a particular material. In DDO, weapon materials allow the weapon to bypass the damage reduction of certain types of creatures. So a DR5/adamantine is bypassed by adamantine weapons.

Flametouched Iron
Description: “Mined only in Thrane, flametouched iron is rare and considered sacred by the Church of the Silver Flame. When mined, its iron variety has a speckled read color, resembling dust. Adherents of the Church of the Silver Flame believe that the flametouched iron caries the particular blessing of their deity, and they use it to make holy symbols, weapons, and armor. A flametouched iron weapon is treaded as a good-aligned weapon”
Comment: Weapon treated as Good aligned and is equivalent to Holy or Pure Good weapon traits. Since this trait doesn’t add any additional level requirements nor bonus value to a weapon, so you can see other more powerful prefix and suffix effects with  this material.

Darkwood
Description: “This rare Magical wood is as hard as normal wood but very light.”
Comment:Darkwood is slightly lighter than normal wood. Only bow, quaterstaff, crossbow and club weapons are made out of darkwood. Personally, I think darkwood is pretty useless, unless you totally gimped your Strength score.

Densewood
Description: “One of the most important products of the forests of Aerenal, densewood is a strong, hard, heavy wood similar to iron it its properties.”
Comment: This material is specific to the Eberron Campaign setting. Items made of densewood weigh twice as much as normal wood, though this is not the case in DDO. Only bow, quaterstaff, crossbow and club weapons are made out of densewood. The beneficial effects of this material are negligible to a character within gameplay.

Byeshk:
Description: “Mind in the Byeshk and Graywall Mountains bordering Droaam, this rare metal is prized by smiths for use in jewelry and weapons. It has a lustrous purple sheen and is hard and dense. Byeshk weapons are able to overcome the protective damage reduction of some aberrations, which can be resistant to other weapons.”
Comment: Bypasses damage reduction of the Daelkyr, such as Beholders, Mindflayers, Therashk Hounds,  Xy’zzy (in theory) and other Abberations from Xoriat.

Adamantine
Description: “Found only in meteorites and the rarest of all veins in magical areas, this ultra hard metal adds to the quality of weapon or suit of armor. Weapons made of adamatine have the ability to bypass the protective damage reduction of certain monsters.”
Comment: Bypasses damage reduction of certain monsters, in particular, of many constructs. This includes Flesh Golems, Iron Golem, Stone Golem, Guardian of Shan-To-Kor, and certain Warforged. Adamantine + Blunt works against Clay Golems

Cold Iron
Description: “This iron, mined deep underground and known for its effectiveness against fey creatures and some demons, is forged at a lower temperature to preserve its delicate properties”
Comment: Effective against fey creatures and some demons, including Bralani, Jaralith and Succubus. Cold Iron + Evil aligned weapons work against a Ghaele’s DR. Cold Iron + Good weapons can bypass the DR of Flesh Renders, Ice Flensers, Fire Reavers, and Maraliths

Alchemical Silver
Description: “A complex process involving metallurgy and alchemy can bond silver to a weapon made of steel so that it bypasses the protective damage reduction of creatures such as lycanthropes and vampires.”
Comment: Uh, there are no lycanthropes in DDO. Silver works well against Bearded Devils, Orthons, and Vampires. Silver + Good works well against Pit Fiends, and Horned Devils

Tomorrow, I’ll go over the Basics of Elemental Weapon Enhancements.


Phat Loots! is a semi-random column at Anne’s My.DDO.com blog discussing various topics on DDO items, their mechanics, and crafting systems. Sometimes pictures of particularly tasty gear is posted. At any rate, its all about loot and how much I like them.

Basics of Magical Weapon Enhancements

This is a multiple part series where I plan to go over several aspects of weapons on a very basic level. Today’s article I will go over enhancement slots or traits for weapons.

When you examine a randomly generated magic weapon in DDO you’ll see several things about the weapon, but today I’m going to focus on breaking down a weapon’s title description.

Explaining Weapon Titles

Click on the image to view full size

A weapon’s title can be broken down into a simple pattern:

[Enchantment Bonus Value] [Prefix Enhancement]
[Material Type] [Base Weapon] ["of" Suffix Enhancement]

  • Enchantment Bonus Value - Magic weapons have enhancement bonuses ranging from +1 to +5. They apply these bonuses to both attack and damage rolls when used in combat.
  • Prefix Enhancement - There is a set list as to which types of magical enhancements that may appear in this slot
  • Material Type - Special materials may give additional properties to weapons
  • Base Weapon - This can range from a simple club to an exotic Kopesh.
  • “of” Suffix Enhancement - Like the prefix, there is also a set list as to which kind of enhancements may appear.

Some weapons may not have a Prefix, Material or Suffix, but at minimum they must have a Bonus Value and Base Weapon. Here are some examples:

  • +1 Short Sword
  • +3 Flame Touched Dwarven Axe
  • +2 Holy Longsword of Pure Good
  • +3 Acid Handaxe of Crippling
  • +2 Seeker Silver Light Pick of True Law

A weapon, like most randomly generated items, can have a maximum of one material, one prefix and one suffix. Only unique quest rewards or unique chest loot items can go beyond this rule. You can also add enhancements through crafting as in with the Stone of Change and the Risian Altar. Prefix and Suffix enhancements are not interchangeable; meaning you will not find a suffix enhancement a prefix slot, nor vice versa.

Tomorrow I will post more on weapon materials. And in the next few weeks, I’ll be blogging about each of the weapon enhancements. I decided I wanted to go over them because of the new crafting system. Knowing what’s currently out there in weapons, will make weapon crafting just a bit more easy to understand once it comes out.


Phat Loots! is a semi-random column at Anne’s My.DDO.com blog discussing various topics on DDO items, their mechanics, and crafting systems. Sometimes pictures of particularly tasty gear is posted. At any rate, its all about loot and how much I like them.

DDO New Crafting Device

DDO Phat Loots: New Weapon Crafting Highlights for Update 9

In light of the new and upcoming crafting system, I thought it would be neat to go over the highlights.  Though I can only speculate on what the final crafting system will be like, but from interviews and articles on Turbine during PAX East 2011 this is what I know:

Crafting Levels
  • Weapon Crafting will be the first of many item types that players can craft under this new system
  • Players will be able to pick and choose which traits or enhancements to put on the weapon
  • In the first generation of the crafting system, players will be able to “deconstruct and transfer” the following weapon enhancements from randomly generated treasure weapons to their crafted weapon:
    • Enchantment Bonus Value - weapons have an enchantment bonus ranging from +1 to +5 which apply to both attack and damage rolls when used in combat
    • Prefix Enchantment - There is a fixed set list of prefix enchantments, but they include elemental and alignment damage modifiers. There are 28 or so prefix enhancements in total.
    • “of” Suffix Enhancement - Usually listed after the “of” when examining a weapon. There are more suffix enhancements than prefix ones, but they include enhancements such as bane and spell boosting, in addition to a fixed list. There are more than 30 suffix enhancements, not including all the different combinations for bane types and spell boosting.
  • This is a skill based crafting system and there will be three different schools of crafting that any player can earn experience and level up in: arcane, elemental, and divine.
  • Deconstructing stations will be used to deconstruct items. Crafting Stations will be used to crate items.
  • When you select an enchantment to transfer, only one can be transferred. Though result will transfer the enchantment to the target weapon, it also ends up destroying the source weapon.
  • The percent success rate of crafting an item is based on your crafting level. How difficult a weapon enhancement is to place on your new weapon is something I can only guess at, but I do know that each enhancement has a base price modifier which modifies the price of a weapon. Now it could be that this is how the system will determine difficulty for crafting. Or they can use an entirely different system.

Crafting Levels

Crafting Levels

Sources

I’ve gathered this information from different articles and interviews.  I’ll list them here for your reviewing pleasure:


Phat Loots! is a semi-random column at Anne’s My.DDO.com blog discussing various topics on DDO items, their mechanics, and crafting systems. Sometimes pictures of particularly tasty gear is posted. At any rate, its all about loot and how much I like them.

Scorrow

A Monster Minute for Jim: Scorrows and Driders

Queen of the Demonweb PitsJim Roslof, former Art Director for TSR and D&D artist, was known for his cover art and interior illustrations in classic D&D modules. Jim passed away at the age of 65 earlier this week on March 19th. His best known piece was the cover art of Keep on the Borrderlands, an early best selling module written by Gary Gygax in 1979.

The module that I know Jim Roslof’s work is from the Queen of the Demonweb Pits - a high level module where players cross over into the Abyssal realms to battle avatars and a goddess. I picked up a used copy of this module from a bookstore after reading the novel of the same title, written by Paul Kidd. Sig also owns a copy from his childhood days. When we think of classic "Golden Age" D&D art, we both think of Jim Roslof’s work.

Jim Roslof married Laura S. Miller in Aptos, California; they had three children and four grandchildren at the time of his death.

Driders in D&D
The scorrow is a relatively new monster in the D&D universe and is specifically used in the Eberron campaign settings, but its predecessor was the drider. Driders, like the scorrow, are categorized as aberrations for its creature type; mostly because of their bizarre anatomy. Driders are the centaur-like creatures, but instead of a horse body they have a spider body and drow body from the waist up where the spider’s head should be.

The drider was first introduced in AD&D in the module Queen of the Demonweb Pits. They are often used in the World of Greyhawk and Forgotten Realms campaign setting and are often found in Underdark realms. In this version of D&D, a drider is a cursed drow who offended the goddess Lolith in someway or failed one of her tests of faith.  A drider retains much of its abilities possessed before transformation and therefore are most likely to have magical or clerical abilities.  In drow communities, driders are shunned outcasts. They may be found in the company of other giant spiders if not solitaire.

Scorrow in D&D Eberron
ScorrowA scorrow has eight arthropod legs that support a long scorpion body. Where the head of scorpion should normally be, there is attached an upper torso of a dark skinned elf, complete with arms capable of wielding poisonous blades. Some scorrow are born with scorpion claws instead of hands, but this often makes them less efficient in battle. Of course, all scorrow are born with deadly stinging tails.

Though a scorrow has physical affinity to drow, they are not merely transformed drow, they are a race unto themselves. Scorrow live long lives and reproduce infrequently. Their young hatch fully formed and is capable of traveling with the hive at birth.

Scorrow tribes are jungle fairing migratory creatures, wandering in search of prey. They live in small clans. They have distain from other races and often isolate themselves. Though the drow of Xen’drik respect scorrow and see them as divine beings of Vulkoor, they rarely work together. Only on rare occasions will scorrow let drow live amongst their clans, and only after proving their worth.

The true origins of the scorrow are lost, but each clan will claim that they were once the most skilled tribe of drow hunters in Xen’drik. Their god, Vulkoor, admired their skill and sent them a great gift; a colossal scorpion came amongst them and stung each of their tribe. The poison brought great pain and also a great power. Each drow was transformed into the first scorrow. The scorrow believe that the Great Scorpion still lurks Xen’drik’s jungles, only appearing to those who are worthy of its gifts.

Scorrow in DDO
Scorrow in DDO are found often in company with Menechtaurun desert drow clans or the drow clans of The Red Fens. These clans worship an aspect of the Mockery (a god of the The Dark Six) called the Vulkoor.  Devote worshipers of Vulkoor will undergo scarification practices to please their god, and those especially pious of Vulkoor’s ways are rewarded with transformation into a scorrow servitor.

Scorrow


Monster Minutes is a semi-regular column in Anne’s My.DDO.com blog featuring monsters found in DDO. Each article features a D&D monster not of stats nor numbers, but of story, art, and history - all compressed down into a single (hopefully) readable and digestible blog post. The hope is that people will become interested in not just in DDO, but in other D&D campaign settings and the designers and writers who create them. You can find an index of Monster Minute here and the Monster Minute RSS feed Here.

Tips & Tricks: Healing Amplification

What is Healing Amplification?

Also known as Healing Amp, Healing Amplification is a state applied to your character that increases the number of hit points gained by healing spells.

epicglovesoftheclawWhere can I get Healing Amp From?

You can get healing amp from the following ways. I’ve also listed some examples (I’m NOT going to list all of the healing amp sources. If you want a more comprehensive list of Healing Amp Items, visit Search for DDO Items Website and do a keyword search on “Healing Amplification”, also visit ddowiki.com for additional healing amp feats and enhancements.)

  • Items
    • Dragontouch Armor with healing amp percent boosts can be crafted with the right runes: 10% from Eldritch runes and 20% from Tempest runes
    • Greensteel weapons can give 10% at Tier 1, 20% at Tier 2, and 30% at Tier 3.
    • Levik’s Bracers has a 20% bonus increase to healing amp
    • Search for DDO Items Website for more healing amp items
  • Race Enhancements
    • Humans can get a 30% increase from Human Improved Recovery
    • Half-elves can get 20% increase if they take the Monk Dilettante Feat
    • Half-elves can get 20% increase from Human Improved Recovery
    • Search ddowiki.com for more healing amp enhancements
  • Class Enhancements
    • Monks can get up to 30% from Improved Recovery Line
    • Paladin Prestige Enhancement, Hunter of the Dead, I think can give as much as 30% Healing Amp. I believe It has a 10% increase per rank, but doesn’t list it in the description, so it’s not confirmed.
    • Search ddowiki.com for more healing amp enhancements, if any
  • Feats
    • Paladin Past life feat gives a +5% to healing amp and can be stacked up to three times itself.
    • Search ddowiki.com for more healing amp feats, if any
  • Other Sources
    • Jidz-Tet’ka Bracers give healing amp to monks when in fire stance. This bonus is a +25% Insight bonus to incoming positive energy healing.
    • Though the Finger Necklace is an item, it gives a 10% insight bonus to healing amplification

How is Healing Amp Calculated?

Before we create a formula for how healing amp is applied, let’s go over the rules:

  • Healing Amp from Items that are of the same percentage value do not stack with other healing amp bonuses from other items.  Put in another way, healing amp percentage increases from items that are of different percentages will stack.  Probably because this is typed as an item enchantment bonus.
    • For example you will get a stacking bonus from your 10% on your Dragontouch armor and your 20% Tier 2 Greensteel weapon
    • You will NOT get stacking bonus from your 20% from your Levik’s Bracers and 20% from your Tier 2 Greensteel weapon
  • Healing Amp from race and class enhancements and feats will always stack, even if they are the same percent value
    • For example, Your Monk Improved Recover III of 30% will stack with Human Improved Recovery III of 30%
  • All Healing Amp increases are multiplied when applied. You could say that each percentage is compounded per percent source (so long as it does not break rule number 1)
  • There are only three exceptions that I know of:
    • When wearing the Jidz-Tet’ka bracers in a monk fire stance you gain a spell-like buff called Riik-zik, which gives you a +25% Insight bonus to incoming positive energy healing.  Since this is an insight bonus it may stack differently. Because it’s the only 25% bonus in the game, it would be hard to confirm its true workings
    • Though Finger Necklace is an item, it gives a 10% insight bonus to healing amplification, but instead of compounding, it seems to tack on an additional 10% to ONLY THE BASE VALUE of hit points cured then added. My best guess is because it was one of the first healing amp items in the game and therefore has math that was written differently than other items.
    • I have never taken the Paladin past life feat, so I cannot say for sure on how this stacks. Does it stack like an enhancement (+15% by the third TR) or does it stack multiplicatively (1.05 to the third power)?

So What’s the Basic Formula for Finding Your Total Amount Healed with Healing Amp?

x = Base Value of the Amount Healed

nz = The Value of Each Percent

Healing Amp % Markup = (1 + nz )

Total Amount Healed = x(1+n1 )(1+n2 )  …  (1+nz )

In laymen’s term:

Total Amount Healed = Base Heal Amount* Healing Amp % Markup 1* Healing Amp % Markup 2* (and so on)

Huh? Wha? Can you do that again?

Sure, let’s walk through an example of how healing amp is applied.  Say you are a human monk/paladin. Say you’ve equipped the following Items:

  • Dragontouch Armor with the 10% healing amp
  • Greensteel T3 weapon with 30% healing amp
  • A Tower of Despair ring with 20% healing amp unlocked on its Incredible Potential attribute.
  • You have the Jidz-Tet’ka bracers and you are in fire stance for 25% bonus
  • Epic Gloves of the Claw for 30% healing amp

Then you also have that one funky item

  • You also have the Finger Necklace for an additional 10% oddity bonus to healing amp

You’ve also taken the following Enhancements:

  • Human Improved Recovery III - 30%
  • Monk Improved Recovery I - 10%
  • Paladin Prestige Hunter of the Dead II - 20%

Let’s say you get healed by an Unyielding Sovereignty from a cleric, which does 1000 hit point cure. But first, let’s first apply the percent markup per bonus value:

  • Dragontouch armor 10% -> 1 + 0.1 = 1.1 (or 110%)
  • Greensteel T3 weapon 30% -> 1 + 0.3 = 1.3 (130%)
  • Tower of Despair ring 20% -> 1 + 0.2 = 1.2 (120%)
  • Jidz-Tet’ka Bracer w/ Fire Stance 25% -> 1 + 0.25 = 1.25 (125%)
  • Epic Gloves of the Claw 30% -> you already have 30% from your Greensteel Weapon, this will be excluded
  • Finger Necklace, 10% -> 1 + 0.1 = 1.1 (110% — remember this is the odd one)
  • Human Improved Recovery III, 30% -> 1 + 0.3 = 1.3 (130%)
  • Monk Improved Recovery I, 10% -> 1 + 0.1 = 1.1 (110%)
  • Paladin Prestige Hunter of the Dead II, 20% -> 1 + 0.2 = 1.2 (120%)

Now, let’s multiply the percentages to find the total percent markup. We’ll leave out the Finger Necklace, because it’s weird:

(1.1) * (1.3) * (1.2) * (1.25) * (1.3) * (1.1) * (1.2) = 3.68082 = 368.082% Healing Amp

For the Finger Necklace, remember that its percent bonus is only applied to the base value, which is 1000, then added after the percent markup from all the other items and enhancements:

1000 * 0.1 = 100

Now we apply the total percent bonus to the base value, and round down:

1000(3.68082) + 100 = 3780

The total amount healed will be 3780 hit points.

What about Warforged?

Warforged are different than other races because their base healing number is always LESS THAN 100 percent and therefore reducing the product of their total healing amp.  As a Warforged you get healed half as much other races if you don’t have any enhancements to modify that value.

WF Base Healing Amount = Base Heal Amount *(0.5 + Warforged Healers Friend % Amount)

WF Total Healing Amount =WF Base Healing * Healing Amp % Markup 1 * Healing Amp % Markup 2 * (and so on)

In math speak:

z = WF Healer’s Friend Bonus

W =WF Healing Base = x(0.5+z)

Total Amount Healed =W(1+n1 )(1+n2 ) … (1+nz )

With Warforged Healer’s Friend III, you can get an additional 25% increase. So for example, if you were healed for 1000 hit points as a Warforged without any items or other enhancements towards healing amp, you would get:

1000[0.5 + 0.25] = 750

So if you were a Warforged monk/paladin with all the items, class enhancements, and the WF enhancements instead of the human like in the example above:

(1.1) * (1.3) * (1.2) * (1.25) * (1.1) * (1.2) = 2.8314 = 283.14% Healing Amp

The Finger Necklace:

750 * 0.1 = 75

With the total percent bonus to the WF base value, and round down:

750(2.8314) + 75 = 2198

The total amount healed on this Warforged will be 2198 hit points.

What’s the Highest Healing Amp Possible?

My best guess is a Half-Elf Monk Dilettante Defender of Siberys, because at Defender of Siberys III, you can get a +100% Healing Amp active power called Glorious Stand in addition to racial enhancements and items that’s a lot of healing amp

  • +100% Glorious Stand power
  • +20% Human Improved Recovery
  • +20% Half-Elf Improved Recovery

With the following gear:

  • +30% Triple Positive Greensteel Weapon or Epic Gloves of the Claw
  • +25% Jidz-tetka Bracers with in fire stance
  • +20% Dragontouch Tempest Rune
  • +10% Dragontouch Eldrich Rune
  • +10% Finger Necklace

(2.0) *(1.2) * (1.2) * (1.3) * (1.25) * (1.2) * (1.1) = 6.1776 = 617.76% Healing Amp for everything except the Finger Necklace

Say your healing value was 1000 again:

(1000 * 6.1776) + (1000 * 0.1) = 6277 Total Hit Points Healed

Summary on Healing Amp in DDO

Healing amp (spell amplification for that matter) is pretty specific to DDO, and I can’t think any D&D table top variant game that has it. Really, I think applying percentages to numbers isn’t a D&D tradition - usually you roll more dice, and occasionally double a number. Making players use a calculator is definitely not a D&D thing. The only reason why its fairly easy to figure out how it works, is that there is evidence through numbers displayed in the combat logs and through descriptions of items, feats, and enhancements. Even then, the descriptions in the DDO Compendium on exactly how this mechanic is sparse and often players mistakenly add their percent bonuses rather than multiply. So I hope you find this little tutorial helpful, and if you find any mistakes let me know!